Today's News - Friday, August 16, 2013

19-year-old Todd Kapcsos says he was tired of seeing crime and drugs on the streets of Moxham, that’s why he dressed like a ninja, put on a mask, and took a baseball bat outside in mid-July.  Kapcsos is charged with loitering and disorderly conduct, but says he didn’t know he was breaking the law. He has waived the charges to court.

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A Johnstown woman allegedly pretended to be a caseworker for Cambria County Children and Youth Services in order to obtain painkillers last May, “The Tribune-Democrat” reports. 36-year-old Angela Silver was charged with impersonating a public servant, theft and receiving stolen property.

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Police in Somerset are announcing arrests connected with a heroin and cocaine ring.  Yesterday, Police Chief Randy Cox said officers raided an apartment at 127 West Main Street this week after getting a tip there were drug sales taking place.  Two men inside the apartment were arrested after police allegedly found heroin, cocaine, cash and cell phones.  Two suspected buyers were arrested in the parking lot.

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25-year-old Leon Doral Currence will answer charges in Cambria County Court for his alleged involvement with a fatal shooting in the West End of Johnstown, “The Tribune-Democrat” reports. He waived his right to a preliminary hearing.  Witnesses told police that Currence was in possession of a gun that was used to kill a man on July 24th.

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An annual report from the American Cancer Society’s “Cancer Action Network” says many states, including Pennsylvania, are not doing enough to prevent and fight the disease.  The commonwealth received top marks for its tobacco tax rates, but fell short on tobacco prevention and cessation. The report indicates that Pennsylvania’s lack of tax on smokeless tobacco products has caused an increase in their use.

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On September 17th, a three-judge panel from the State Superior Court will hear appeal arguments from Jerry Sandusky.  Judge Jack Panella told the Associated Press the Sandusky case will be one of the first of 45 cases the panel will consider during the session.  No word if the former coach will attend the hearing.  He is serving a 30- to 60-year sentence in the state prison at Waynesburg.  Sandusky’s lawyers say they did not have enough time to prepare for trial and they also think the judge should not have allowed hearsay testimony from a janitor.

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The national DUI crackdown “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” begins today and will run through Labor Day.  More than 600 Pennsylvania police departments and State Police will participate in a series of special enforcement initiatives including checkpoints and roving patrols that will focus on both alcohol and drug-impaired drivers.

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A new report is warning that none of the nuclear facilities in the U.S. are protected against a high-force terrorist attack.  It adds that some are still open to the theft of bomb-grade nuclear fuel, or sabotage that could cause a nuclear meltdown.  The intent of the report is to reveal security gaps that still exist more than a decade after the 9-11 terrorist attacks. 

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The UN Security Council is urging all parties in Egypt to stop the violence that's killed more than 600 people.  The council wants restraint shown after police and troops put down protests calling for former President Mohamed Mursi to be restored to power. 

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The National Security Agency is breaking privacy rules at a staggering rate.  Citing an internal audit and other top-secret documents, the “Washington Post” reports the NSA has broken those rules or gone beyond its legal authority thousands of times every year.  The report says most of the rules violations involve unauthorized surveillance of Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the U.S. 

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Black box flight recorders recovered from the UPS cargo plane that crashed earlier this week are headed to Washington, DC for analysis.  The Airbus A300 plowed into the ground short of Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport Wednesday morning.  The pilot and co-pilot died in the crash. 

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The trial of the accused Fort Hood shooter is now over a week old.  Jurors got to see more autopsy photos yesterday of victims of U.S. Army Major Nidal Hasan's alleged rampage.  The pictures include those of Specialist Frederick Greene, who charged Hasan in hopes of stopping him.

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A federal judge is not going to be making a decision on American Airlines' bankruptcy plan.  The judge said on Thursday that the Justice Department's lawsuit over its merger with US Airways is the reason for the delay.  He's giving both sides until August 23rd to say why he should or should not rule on the Fort Worth-based airline's plan to exit from bankruptcy.

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A bat-boy for the Atlanta Braves is living up to his title.  According to the "Atlanta Journal Constitution," as the Braves played the Philadelphia Phillies Wednesday, a live bat landed in the infield.  For a moment the umpire stopped the game and Braves shortstop Paul Janish picked up the wayward flyer in his glove.  After dropping it a few times, Janish eventually handed it over the Braves' bat boy, who gathered it up in a towel and brought it into the dugout.  After showing it to the players, the bat-boy eventually gave it to the ground crew.

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A loose license plate is landing one New Jersey man in trouble with the law.  According to the "Newark Star-Ledger," Robert E. Smith is being blamed for doing burnouts on roads and grassy areas surrounding a nursing home in Oxford Township, New Jersey.  The stunt reportedly left black skid marks on the road and ruined the grass on parts of the county-owned sides of the roadway.  As Smith performed burnouts at a nearby area, the license plate to his car apparently fell off.  Police were able to link the two incidents and Smith was cited for disorderly conduct by Oxford police.  He has also been linked to several other similar incidents and may face further citations. 

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The skinniest New York residence has a new owner with a fat pocketbook.  The "New York Post" says the three-story townhouse at 75-and-a-half Bedford Street has sold for three-point-two-five-million-dollars -- or more than one-million per story.  The petite property, which was built in 1873, is just 990-square-feet, and at its widest measures just eight-feet, four-inches.  But it has a big history.  Cary Grant and John Barrymore have both lived in the house, which is also where Edna St. Vincent Millay wrote the award-winning "Ballad of the Harp-Weaver."  Anthropologist Margaret Meade once called the place home, while children's author Ann McGovern referred to it as living in a "doll house."

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Most Americans say they wouldn't quit their jobs even if they won the lottery.  According to a new Gallup poll, two-thirds of Americans would choose to continue working if they won a ten-million dollar jackpot.  The majority of the 31 percent who said they would stop working were of the Baby Boomer generation.  The number of those who said that ten-million dollars wasn't enough to quit their job has been on a steady increase since 2005.  Of those respondents, 44 percent said they continue in their current jobs, while 23 percent that would continue in a different line of work.  Those who had a post-graduate degree were most likely than the rest to say that they would remain in their current profession if ten-million dollars came their way. 

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Middle-aged men who drive blue BMWs are the most prone to road rage, according to a survey conducted by VoucherCodesPro.com.  The results found that men between the ages of 35 and 50 were the most likely to lose their temper on the road.  Those behind the wheel of a BMWs were ranked the most aggressive, followed by those driving Land Rovers, Audis, Subarus and Vauxhalls.  The survey also found that Friday evening after work was the peak time for people who get angry on the road.  Nearly one-third of respondents said that they usually expressed their anger by shouting or swearing.  Only three percent said they had ever stopped their car to confront another driver.

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